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Author Topic: Dorwinion as Middle-Earth's Georgia?  (Read 823 times)

Traverse Travis

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Dorwinion as Middle-Earth's Georgia?
« on: December 13, 2012, 05:00:00 PM »

If one accepts the premise that every Mannish country in Middle-earth
might be evocative of a specific real-world culture of circa 900 to 1100
A.D., then what about Dorwinion?

For reference, there's an article about Dorwinion here:
http://lalaith.vpsurf.de/Tolkien/Bladorthin.html

In my earlier investigations, I supposed the Men of Dorwinion to be like
Mordvinians, for a couple reasons:

1) The location of Dorwinion relative to the River Running is similar to
   the location of Mordovia relative to the Kama River.
2) The name 'Mordvins' is phonaesthetically similar to Dorwinion, and it
   appears on a map in Shepherd's Atlas, which is an atlas that I
   suspect jrr owned or had access to. (http://Http://www.lib.utexas.break_wrap
   edu/maps/historical/shepherd/europe_byzantine_empires.jpg).

Recently I've been reconsidering this because:

3) Mordvinians don't seem to have an especial relationship to
   wine or trade.
4) They are deep inside Russia. And since the 'easterlings with axes'
   are almost certainly the Middle-earth 'Russians', which the Men of
   the West had never encountered before the Battle of the Pelennor, it
   would be unlikely for the 'Mordvinians' to be well-known trading
   partners, and a former part of the Kingdom of Gondor.

I'm considering two other options:
5) That Men of Dorwinion are like Vlachs (Romanians)
6) That Men of Dorwinion are like Iberians (Georgians)

Why? Because both the Vlachs and Georgians grew wine. And they are still
approximately located near the Black Sea like Dorwinion is situated
along the Sea of Rhun. And they were both the furthest extension of the
Roman or Byzantine Empires, in the same way that Dorwinion is supposed
to be the furthest extension of the Kingdom of Gondor.

Right now, I think Georgia fits better than the Vlachs. Georgia is a
real 'land of wine' and a 'land of youth'. The Vlachs didn't have their
own kingdoms until the 1400s. They were a simple shepherd-folk ruled by
various invaders from the steppes. In the late-Third Age, their
Middle-earth equivalents are probably in southern Rhovanion, ruled over
by the Balchoth.

In contrast, the Georgians had a distinct kingdom throughout the early
middle ages. And Georgia is reportedly the birthplace of wine, and is
still the most treasured wine in the northern Eurasia.

In the same way that the leader of the Southrons in the Battle of the
Pelennor is a sort of 'Middle-earth version' of Saladin, so might the
Great King Bladorthin be equated to the Great King David the Builder,
the most beloved of the Georgian kings, and whose banner became the
national flag of Georgia.

And Georgia is a land of youth (gwinion) because the country has been
renowned for its healthy, long-lived populace.

The language of Dorwinion would then be a phonaesthetically Old
Georgian-flavored Hildian language. It might be 'fictively represented'
as Old Georgian. Its script would be tengwar, but in the visual style of
the Georgia's first script--the Asomtavruli script.



[elfling ID#36443]
[original subject: Dorwinion as Middle-Earth's Georgia?]
« Last Edit: December 13, 2012, 05:00:00 PM by Traverse Travis »
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